CRAC Presents the Canadian Revival of Psychedelic Research Dinner 2020

Play Video

If the recent Canadian Revival of Psychedelic Research dinner (February 19) is any indication, Canada isn’t done bringing alternative medicines to the mainstream. Before even the Harvard Psilocybin Project, Canada was home to some of the most critical psychedelic research in the world. British-born psychiatrist Humphry Osmond coined the word psychedelic while working with hallucinogens at Weyburn Mental Hospital in Saskatchewan. Today, Canada is experiencing a revival of psychedelic research being led in large part by patients who need to explore alternative treatments for conditions of the subconscious, like depression and substance use disorders. 

If the recent Canadian Revival of Psychedelic Research dinner (February 19) is any indication, Canada isn’t done bringing alternative medicines to the mainstream. Before even the Harvard Psilocybin Project, Canada was home to some of the most critical psychedelic research in the world. British-born psychiatrist Humphry Osmond coined the word psychedelic while working with hallucinogens at Weyburn Mental Hospital in Saskatchewan. Today, Canada is experiencing a revival of psychedelic research being led in large part by patients who need to explore alternative treatments for conditions of the subconscious, like depression and substance use disorders. 

The dinner was hosted by the Clinical Research Association of Canada with the esteemed president, Sabrina Ramkellewan, leading the programme. The Clinical Research Association of Canada is a non-profit that provides time and space for the discussions relevant to clinical research in Canada. The dinner was a sold-out affair, a testament to the growing interest in psychedelic research and the people driving this emerging medicine.

Mark Haden, Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies

The night began with Mark Haden, Executive Director of MAPS as well as Adjunct Professor at the University of British Columbia School of Population and Public Health. Mark gave us a primer on types of psychedelics, what they do, and why they are such a hot topic in mental health medicine right now

Irie Selkirk & Seve Sadoff, Sansero Life Sciences (& Rise Wellness Retreat)

We heard from Irie Selkirk and her business partner Steve Sadoff about two very unique psychedelic-influenced ventures. Irie has worked with some of the biggest names in cannabis, and now takes wellness-seekers through gentle, multi-day psychedelic journeys in Jamaica through her Rise Wellness Retreat. The pair also introduced us to Sansero, a psilocybin life sciences company that is currently raising funds to produce what could be a revolutionary alternative to conventional antidepressants.

Jacqui Childs and Daniel Carcillo, patient stories

Finally, we heard the emotional stories of two patients who have incorporated psychedelic medicines into their lives with great success. Jacqui Childs is a wife and mother who says she was lost in a downward spiral of pharmaceuticals meant to target her anxiety, depression and PTSD. She thanks cannabis and psilocybin for her transition away from pharmaceutical medications. Daniel Carcillo rose to fame as an NHL player known for fighting. What spectators didn’t know was that the real battle was taking place under this player’s helmet. Today, he is a mental health advocate who found a new, more compassionate purpose through the mind-healing power of psychedelics. Both of their stories are incredible.

With a horizon full of new research, plus business opportunities, and patients who are courageous enough to try the less-known, it’s absolutely no wonder that psychedelics are experiencing a revival. What’s more encouraging is that these opportunities are right on our doorstep in Canada—more so here than in so many other countries.

Will Canada be at the forefront of psychedelic-based breakthroughs in mental health and wellness?

After attending the Canadian Revival of Psychedelic Research in a room packed with like-minded people, we can see that there is nothing but a lot of hope for this brave new world we are just beginning to (re)discover.

Leave a Reply